Last edited by Malalmaran
Saturday, May 16, 2020 | History

4 edition of Child-specific exposure factors handbook found in the catalog.

Child-specific exposure factors handbook

Child-specific exposure factors handbook

  • 137 Want to read
  • 18 Currently reading

Published by National Center for Environmental Assessment--Washington Office, Office of Research and Development, U.S. Environmental Protection Agency in Washington, DC .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Environmental risk assessment,
  • Children -- Diseases -- Prevention

  • Edition Notes

    Statementprepared by Versar, Inc. for the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency
    ContributionsNational Center for Environmental Assessment (Washington, D.C.), United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Office of Research and Development, Versar, Inc
    The Physical Object
    FormatMicroform
    Pagination1 v. (various pagings)
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL14534653M
    OCLC/WorldCa52870862

    Thus, the data presented in this article can be used to update the U.S. EPA's Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook and to improve estimates of nondietary ingestion in . Child-specific exposure factors handbook (EPAPB). Interim Report. National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, Washington, DC. EPA (U.S. Environmental Protection Agency). (, December 5). Human health toxicity values in Superfund risk assessments (OSWER Directive ). Memorandum from.

    Current Methods for Evaluating Children's Exposures for Use in Health Risk Assessment. Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook, (6) This book . The current version incorporates information from the previous “Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook” and is meant to supersede the stand-alone child-specific version. A related U.S. EPA effort led to the “Child-Specific Exposure Scenarios Examples” as a companion document to the EFH. The example scenarios were compiled from Cited by: 5.

    There has been an increasing need for the risk assessment of external environmental hazards in children because they are more sensitive to hazardous chemical exposure than adults. Therefore, the development of general exposure factors is required for appropriate risk assessment in Korean children. This study aimed to determine the general exposure factors among Korean Author: Hyojung Yoon, Sun-Kyoung Yoo, Jungkwan Seo, Taksoo Kim, Pyeongsoon Kim, Pil-Je Kim, Jinhyeon Park, J.   The EPA Child-Specific Exposure Factor Handbook (USEPA, ) recommendations for soil and dust ingestion together are 60 mg/day for children of ages of 6 to Cited by:


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Child-specific exposure factors handbook Download PDF EPUB FB2

22 rows  The latest edition of the Exposure Factors Handbook was released inbut since OctoberEPA has begun to release chapter updates individually. This new process allows risk assessors to get the latest information as new data becomes available.

To make it easier to find these chapter updates, the chapter date column has been added to Table 1. The goal of the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook is to fulfill this need. The document provides a summary of the available and up-to-date statistical data on various factors assessing children exposures.

These factors include drinking water consumption, soil ingestion, inhalation. Notice: In OctoberEPA announced the release of a companion report, Highlights of the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook to the technical report released in This highlights document provides introductory information about the handbook and presents a summary of the recommendations presented in the Child-Specific Exposure Factors.

Get this from a library. Child-specific exposure factors handbook. [National Center for Environmental Assessment (Washington, D.C.);]. Child-specific exposure factors handbook. Washington, DC: National Center for Environmental Assessment, (OCoLC) Material Type: Government publication, National government publication, Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All.

Exposure Factors Handbook. also incorporates new factors and data provided in the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook (and other relevant information published through July The information presented in this edition of the.

Exposure Factors Handbook. supersedes the -Specific Exposure. Child Factors Handbook. Cover of the Child-Specific Exposure Factors HandbookInNCEA published the first Exposure Factors Handbook (EPA//P/Fa-c), which includes exposure factors and related data on both adults and children.

The goal of the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook is to consolidate all child exposure data into one single document. The Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is announcing that Eastern Research Group, Inc.

(ERG), an EPA contractor for external scientific review, will convene an independent panel of experts and organize and conduct a peer-review workshop, to review the external review draft document titled, “Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook” (EPA.

Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook is being prepared to focus on various factors used in assessing exposure, specifically for children ages years.

The recommended values are based solely on our interpretation of the available data. In many situations, the use of different values may be appropriate in consideration of policy.

USEPA (). Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook. Washington DC: Office of Research and Development. has been cited by the following article: TITLE: Health Risk Assessment in Children by Arsenic and Mercury Pollution of Groundwater in a Mining Area in Sonora, Mexico.

Equally important, rapid changes in behavior and physiology may lead to differences in exposure as a child grows up. From United States. Environmental Protection Agency. Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook (Final Report).

Sept. Web. 5 November The passage appears on page 24 • 25 INTENDED AUDIENCE 26 The Child-specific Exposure Factors Handbook may be used by exposure assessors 27 inside the Agency as well as outside, who need to obtain data on standard factors needed to 28 calculate childhood exposure to toxic chemicals.

The primary products of the program are the Exposure Factors Handbook (USEPA ) and the Child-Specific Exposure Factors handbook 9USEPA ). EPA's National Center for Environmental Assessment (NCEA) maintains the exposure factors handbooks and periodically updates those documents using current literature and other reliable data made.

The full document can be downloaded on the USEPA website at the above link. The Child-Specific Exposure Scenarios Examples provides common exposure pathways and tools for estimating exposure, dose, and adverse health effects in children.

The scenarios provided in the document use data found in EPA’s Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook and the Exposures Factors Handbook: Edition.

Childhood Lifestages. The Korean Exposure Factors Handbook, a kind of pilot study conducted as part of the "Human Exposure Assessment for Total Risk Assessment of Environmental Contaminants" inwas the nation's first study that noted the need for recommended values of exposure factors and explored the potential for their development.

The study reviewed the Cited by: 8. It also reflects the revisions made to the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook, which was updated and published in Each chapter in the revised Exposure Factors Handbook presents recommended values for the exposure factors covered in the chapter as well as a discussion of the underlying data used in developing the recommendations.

NAS “Red Book”: Risk Assessment in the Federal Government • Exposure Factors Handbook; Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook • Dermal Exposure Assessment Guidance • Children’s Age Groups 6 3. Updating the EPA Guidelines for Exposure Assessment Presentation by Gary Bangs, EPA, ORD/RAF, Sept 7, Exposure Factors Handbook ( Final Report).

EPA//P/F. EPA//P/F. Washington, D.C.: United States Environmental Protection Agency, Office of Research and Development, National Center for Environmental Assessment. The U.S. EPA has chosen to use all three methods, with an emphasis on the biokinetic model comparison method, to make recommendations on maximum soil ingestion values in the Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook.

47 The handbook recommends a maximum average soil and dust ingestion of 60 mg/day for children ages 6 weeks to 1 year and mg Cited by: 2. Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook The EPA is announcing the availability of a final report titled, 'Child-Specific Exposure Factors Handbook' (EPA//R/F).

It provides updated information on various physiological & behavioral factors used in assessing children's exposure to environmental contaminants. The Korean Exposure Factors Handbook, a kind of pilot study conducted as part of the "Human Exposure Assessment for Total Risk Assessment of Environmental Contaminants" inwas the nation's first study that noted the need for recommended values of exposure factors and explored the potential for their development.

The study reviewed the.However, the guidance clearly states that the defaults should be used where â there is a lack of site-specific data or consensus on which parameter to choose, given a range of possibilities.â These default exposure assumptions are supplemented with data from the Exposure Factors Handbook (EPA a), and Child Specific Exposure Factors.